A Look at Our First Acquisition

We are proud to announce our first-ever physical acquisition, a collection of 18th and 17th-century manuscripts related to the Pohlmann family from Hille, where the family originated. This collection is not just an addition to our archives, but a tangible link to the very roots of the family tree.


Announcement

It is with great pleasure that we announce our first-ever acquisition: a collection of manuscripts pertaining to the Pohlmann family from Hille, the family’s place of origin. It seems fitting that our first acquisition should trace back to the very roots of the family tree.

The collection comprises 12 manuscripts from the 17th and 18th centuries, including receipts, letters, inheritance documents, and promissory notes. Of particular interest are seven mortgage notes from 1697, all signed and sealed by Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynhausen (1653-1722) and his wife Susanna, née Pohlmann (1644-1728) in Hille. Both issued the promissory notes to borrow money “to pay off our general debt.” The promissory notes have been cut, indicating its invalidity (i.e., the borrowed money has been repaid).

 Promissory note from Hille 1697, sealed from Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynahusen and Susanna Pohlmann to Pastor Dankersen
Promissory note from Hille 1697, sealed from Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynahusen and Susanna Pohlmann to Pastor Dankersen

It is believed that these funds allowed von Oeynhausen and Pohlmann to purchase a farm in the heart of Hille that had previously been owned by the von Voss family; it was subsequently named Oeynhausen Hof. The farm remained in the family for nearly a century and is remarkably well-preserved. Today, it is known as “Reimlers Hof” and is a listed building.

As one might expect, some of the documents are in poor condition with the paper heavily browned and stained, creased and some edge damage. Some manuscripts even have tears, resulting in the loss of some text. Maintaining physical items can be a significant responsibility. Older items, often in poor condition, demand careful attention to prevent further deterioration. These documents often require conservation and restoration to slow down degradation. Ensuring their preservation through optimal storage conditions is also important. For artifacts like paper and manuscripts, archival storage in acid-free sleeves is essential, along with maintaining low humidity levels and avoiding exposure to heat, sunlight, or fluorescent light. Implementing these precautions can bring considerable cost. However, for many family historians, researchers, and genealogists who have inherited family heirlooms, such protective measures are not unfamiliar territory.

To that end, we will be storing these manuscripts under optimal conditions for preservation until they can be evaluated for possible restoration.

Manuscripts in the collection

I.

Four receipts between 1742-1779 to Christian Friedrich Pohlmann, including Pastor Pöppelmann

A receipt or invoice dated 1745 to Christian Friedrich Pohlmann (d. 1781)
A receipt or invoice dated 1745 to Christian Friedrich Pohlmann (d. 1781)

These four receipts date from 1742 to 1779 and are addressed to the Pohlmann family in Hille. Christian Friedrich Pohlmann (d. 1781 at the age of 70), major and owner of today’s “Reimlers Hof” in Hille, was married to Maria Ferdinanda Augusta, née Hartog.

II.

Letter 1750 from Pastor F.W. Stoltmann to his brother-in-law Christian Friedrich Pohlmann

Written by Pastor Friedrich Wilhelm Stoltmann (born March 4, 1695 in Minden; died approx. 1764), who was the pastor in Rahden from 1727. He was married to Maria Charlotte, née Hartog (daughter of the rent master of Haddenhausen and Anne Katharina Hartog, née Kymmell). One son was Carl Ludwig Stoltmann (born May 13, 1740), who studied at the Latin school of the Francke Foundations in Halle from 1758.

The letter, dated October 9, 1750, originates from Rahden and is addressed to “Monsieur Pohlmann, Seigneur de Hille” in Petershagen. The recipient is Christian Friedrich Pohlmann, the owner of what is now known as “Reimlers Hof” in Hille. Pohlmann, who passed away in 1781 at the age of 70, is also the sender’s brother-in-law. In accordance with the customs of the time, he is referred to as “Mr. Brother” in the letter.

Pohlmann was married twice, his current wife at the time of the letter being Maria Ferdinanda Augusta, formerly Hartog. His first wife, Albertine, from the von der Mülmb family (also known as von Mülben or von der Mülbe), had passed away on August 23, 1746, or possibly 1745.

The letter serves as a reminder regarding the interest due on a loan of 290 Reichstaler, which was originally due in April. Despite Pohlmann’s promise on July 29th to settle this interest “as soon as possible,” payment has yet to be received.

III.

Documents in 1744 about the relatives of Cornet Albrecht Clamer Kymmell

Documents dated 1744 about the relatives of Cornet Albrecht Clamer Kymmell
Documents dated 1744 about the relatives of Cornet Albrecht Clamer Kymmell

This document is in reference to the relatives of Albrecht Clamer Kymmell, who passed away in March 1744 while serving as a cornet in the Dutch military at the Deventer garrison. The documents in question are concerned with identifying his kin for the purpose of distributing his estate.

A 1-page etter from Hille, dated April 1744. Christian Friedrich Pohlmann, who died in 1781 at the age of 70 and was the proprietor of the contemporary “Reimlers Hof” in Hille, was married to Maria Ferdinanda Augusta, nee Hartog. He reached out to Inspector Saurbrey to obtain a list of the children of the late Commissioner Anne Katharina Hartog, nee Kymmell (a sister of the Cornet and Pohlmann’s mother-in-law). He requested this information to be confirmed “under the signature and church seal.”

In addition to his wife, Maria Ferdinanda Augusta Pohlmann, nee Hartog, the following are listed:

  • Carl Philipp Hartog, an official in Batterfeld (???)
  • Maria Stoltmann, nee Hartog, wife of Friedrich Wilhelm Stoltmann, a pastor in Rahden
  • Wilhelmine Louise, the widow of a monastery secretary whose name is incomplete due to damage to the document, currently residing in Minden.

IV.

Documents from 1690 and 1697 from Schreiber to von Oeynhausen

The document dating back to 1690 was authored by the regional syndic, Johann Heinrich Schreiber, while the 1697 document is believed to have been penned by his son.

These documents were addressed to the “Captain or Major of Oynhausen,” referring to Susanna von Oynhausen, born Pohlmann (1644-1728). She was the wife of Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynhausen (1653-1722), a Brandenburg colonel sergeant in the Du Hamel Cuirassier Regiment and the proprietor of the Oeynhausen Manor in the heart of the village of Hille, which is currently known as Reimlers Hof.

These historical documents were found among a collection of promissory notes issued to Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynhausen. Each document pertained to financial matters involving the noble von Ledebur family.


V.

Invoice 1745 from Johann August Enax to Christian Friedrich Pohlmann

This document was issued by Johann August Enax (1705-1794), the Royal Prussian privileged court and government printer, for a sum of 4 thalers and 30 groschen. The payment was for “2 corpse carmina each sheet 200 edition” dedicated to the late Mrs. Pohlmann. The document was dated on September 17, 1745, with a note indicating the payment was made on September 21. It was signed by “JA Enax” and addressed to Mr. Pohlmann in Hille, accompanied by a package.

The intended recipient was presumably Major Christian Friedrich Pohlmann, who passed away in 1781 at 70 years old. He was the proprietor of the so-called Pohlmannschen Hof located in the heart of Hille village, now known as Reimlers Hof. According to the book “The Knights’ Seats of the County of Ravensberg and the Principality of Minden” (p. 152), his wife Albertine, born von Mülmb, died on August 23, 1746. However, there might be a mistake in the book’s record, suggesting she may have died in 1745. This theory is supported by the fact that the invoice was found among a collection of documents belonging to the von Mülmb family (also known as von Mülben / von der Mülbe).

Promissory note from Hille 1697, sealed from Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynahusen and Susanna Pohlmann to Organist Viermann
Promissory note from Hille 1697, sealed from Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynahusen and Susanna Pohlmann to Organist Viermann

VI.

Seven promissory notes in Hille 1697, sealed from Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynahusen and Susanna Pohlmann

Seal with coat of arms of von Oeynahusen
Seal with coat of arms of von Oeynahusen

This collection comprises seven distinct mortgage notes from 1697, all bearing the signatures and seals of Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynhausen (1653-1722), and his wife Susanna Pohlmann (1644-1728), of Hille. Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynhausen, a Brandenburg sergeant at the cuirassier regiment Du Hamel, and his wife Susanna, proprietors of the von Oeynhausenschen Hof in the heart of Hille village (presently known as Reimlers Hof), issued promissory notes. The funds were borrowed with the intent of settling their overall debt. Each note carries the signatures and seals of both borrowers. To signify that the debt has been repaid and the note is no longer valid, the promissory note has been deliberately cut. The lenders associated with these notes are as follows: Reineke Baur, J.D. Viestelmann, Organist Viermann, Rolf Wehmer, Diederich Schlinger, Pastor Dankersen, and V. Müller Henry Meger.

About Oeynhausen Hof in Hille

Johann Ernst Heinrich von Oeynhausen, born on February 28, 1653 in Brandenburg, was the son of Colonel Johann Christoph von Oeynhausen and Catharina Sabine von Quernheim. He passed away on June 29, 1722, likely at Oeynahusen Hof in Hille. His distinguished military career included roles as a colonel, colonel sergeant, Brandenburg cavalry captain, and the leader of the 6th Company of the Cuirassier Regiment du Hamel. He married Susanna Pohlmann, born on April 24, 1644, and who died on March 30, 1728. Their son Friedrich Wilhelm von Oeynhausen, born on August 31, 1685, tragically died at the young age of 19 while serving as a Brandenburg Cornet in Italy. 

In 1699, the couple acquired a farm in the heart of Hille, previously owned by the von Voss family. It was then named the “von Oeynhausenscher Hof”. Colonel von Oeynhausen and Pohlmann were intimately familiar with Hille. In 1725, she made a generous donation of an altar to the Hille church. Adorned with their family crest, the altar also features exquisite depictions of Christ and the Holy Communion. After Susanne von Oeynhausen’s death, the estate was passed to Christian Gottlieb Ludwig Pohlmann in 1728. His son, Major Christian Friedrich Pohlmann, died in 1781 at the age of 70. Through marriage, the farm was transferred to surveyor Karl Heinrich von der Heyde in 1829. In 1882, Friedrich Wilhelm Reimler became the owner of the farm, which is now known as “Reimlers Hof.” Today, the farm remains well-preserved and is listed as a heritage site.1Horst Karl Adolf von der. 1894. Die Rittersitze Der Grafschaft Ravensberg Und Des Fürstentums Minden [The knight seats of the county of Ravensberg and the principality of Minden]. Berlin: Stargardt, 74.

Footnotes
  • 1
    Horst Karl Adolf von der. 1894. Die Rittersitze Der Grafschaft Ravensberg Und Des Fürstentums Minden [The knight seats of the county of Ravensberg and the principality of Minden]. Berlin: Stargardt, 74.
Jake Peterson
Jake Peterson

Jake’s greatest dream is to reveal stories that have been buried in history. He does this through rigorous research and combing through archives to preserve precious stories for future generations. Jake has qualifications in narrative therapy and family studies, and is an author, family historian, and researcher. In 2022, he published his first book “Arcadia.” Follow Jake on Instagram @polmanarkivet.

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